In Crisis News

Today’s In Crisis headlines

(NEW YORK) -- Here are today's In Crisis headlines:

Fewer-than-expected 266K jobs added in March; unemployment rate now 6.1%
Another 266,000 jobs were added to the U.S. labor force in April as the U.S. economy continues to recover from the pandemic, but that number is far lower than the one million new jobs economists were expecting.  Data released Friday morning from the Bureau of Labor Statistics also shows 146,000 fewer jobs were added in March that initially reported -- 770,000 as opposed to 916,000.  That bumped the unemployment rate slightly higher to 6.1% in April, compared to 6% in March.  Most of the new jobs were in leisure and hospitality, other services, and local government education, while jobs were lost in temporary help services, and in courier and messenger businesses. 

COVID-19 numbers
Here's the latest data on COVID-19 coronavirus infections, deaths and vaccinations.

Latest reported COVID-19 numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 156,153,255
Global deaths: 3,258,514.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 580,063.
Number of countries/regions: at least 192
Total patients recovered globally: 92,395,247

Latest reported COVID-19 numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 32,605,487 reported cases in 50 states + the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 580,063.  California has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 62,154.
U.S. total people tested: 441,261,708

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in California, with 3,753,173 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 39.51 million.  This ranks third in the world after England, which has 3,869,113 cases, and Maharashtra, India, which leads the world with 4,942,736 reported cases.  Texas is second in the U.S., with 2,909,076 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 29 million.

Latest reported COVID-19 vaccination numbers in the United States
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a total of 324,610,185 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been distributed in the U.S.  Of those, 251,973,752 doses have been administered, with 149,462,265 people receiving at least one dose and 108,926,627 people fully vaccinated, representing 45% and 32.8% of the total U.S. population, respectively. The Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines each require two doses to be effective.  The Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires a single dose to be effective.

CDC now forecasting up to 600,000 COVID-19 deaths before end of month
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now forecasting there could be up to 600,000 total reported COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. before the end of May.  The agency is now estimating between 586,000 to 600,000 COVID-19 fatalities by the week ending May 29.  As of Friday morning, the U.S. deaths total stands at 580,063, which remains the highest reported number of deaths of any other country, accounting for 17.8% of global fatalities.  The updated CDC deaths forecast means the U.S. can expect to see an additional 6,000 to 20,000 deaths in the next three weeks.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Today’s In Crisis headlines

(NEW YORK) -- Here are today's In Crisis headlines:

Derek Chauvin’s attorney requests new trial
The legal team for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has filed a motion in a Minneapolis court requesting a new trial on multiple grounds, including alleged jury misconduct.  The filing by attorney Eric Nelson cites among its reasons alleged “abuse of discretion that deprived the Defendant of a fair trial; prosecutorial and jury misconduct; errors of law at trial; and a verdict that is contrary to law,” all of which were a “violation of Mr. Chauvin’s constitutional rights to due process and a fair trial.”  Nelson also says failure to sequester the jury during the trial exposed them to “prejudicial publicity regarding the trial during the proceedings, as well as jury intimidation and potential fear of retribution among jurors.” 

John Stiles, deputy chief of staff for Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, said in a statement to ABC News, "The court has already rejected many of these arguments and the State will vigorously oppose them.”  Chauvin was found guilty on April 20 of all three charges he faced in the death of George Floyd during his arrest on May 25 of last year, including the most serious charge, second-degree unintentional murder.  He’s scheduled to be sentenced June 25 and could receive up to 40 years in prison.

Facebook upholds Trump’s ban from posting on platforms
Facebook's independent Oversight Board this morning announced that it’s upholding the platform’s decision on January 7 to ban former President Trump from posting on Facebook and Instagram.  However, the decision notes that the suspension continues to be indefinite, not permanent, and that “Within six months of this decision, Facebook must reexamine the arbitrary penalty it imposed on January 7 and decide the appropriate penalty.”  Though Facebook barred Trump from posting, his page remains visible. 

Facebook responded to the board’s decision by declaring, in part, that it was “pleased the board has recognized that the unprecedented circumstances justified the exceptional measure we took.”  The response, attributed to Nick Clegg, Facebook VP of Global Affairs and Communications, added, “We will now consider the board’s decision and determine an action that is clear and proportionate. In the meantime, Mr. Trump’s accounts remain suspended.”

Trump was barred from a number of social media outlets, including Twitter, after the deadly January 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol by his supporters, which he encouraged.  In initially barring Trump, Facebook said that “in maintaining an unfounded narrative of electoral fraud and persistent calls to action, Mr. Trump created an environment where a serious risk of violence was possible,” which “severely violated Facebook’s Community Standards and Instagram’s Community Guidelines.”  Twitter, which the former president used sometimes hourly to post his thoughts, “permanently suspended” Trump’s account on that platform on January 8 “due to the risk of further incitement of violence.” 

COVID-19 numbers
Here's the latest data on COVID-19 coronavirus infections, deaths and vaccinations.

Latest reported COVID-19 numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 154,435,614
Global deaths: 3,229,995.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 578,503.
Number of countries/regions: at least 192
Total patients recovered globally: 91,026,848

Latest reported COVID-19 numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 32,513,455 reported cases in 50 states + the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 578,503.  California has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 62,029.
U.S. total people tested: 438,358,030

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in California, with 3,749,580 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 39.51 million.  This ranks third in the world after England, which has 3,865,013 cases, and Maharashtra, India, which leads the world with 4,822,902 reported cases.  Texas is second in the U.S., with 2,903,981 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 29 million.

Latest reported COVID-19 vaccination numbers in the United States
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a total of 318,474,035 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been distributed in the U.S.  Of those, 247,769,049 doses have been administered, with 147,894,671 people receiving at least one dose and 106,168,588 people fully vaccinated, representing 44.5% and 32% of the total U.S. population, respectively. The Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines each require two doses to be effective.  The Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires a single dose to be effective.

President Biden sets new COVID-19 vaccine goals; Pfizer says teen vaccination approval imminent
President Biden is setting new goals for the COVID-19 vaccinations in Americans, calling for 70% of the adult population to have at least one shot and 160 million Americans to be fully vaccinated by July 4th.  The modified mandate appears to be an acknowledgement of what scientists have been saying now for months, which is that eradicating COVID-19 might not be possible, especially with millions of Americans refusing to become vaccinated.  However, if enough Americans are vaccinated, COVID-19 will become manageable, though the goal of herd immunity is likely beyond reach.  Herd immunity is when a large enough percentage of a population develops antibodies – either through vaccination or by recovering from an infection – that they prevent more vulnerable population members from becoming infected.  President Biden in March said achieving herd immunity was necessary before Americans could confidently stop wearing masks. 

Additionally, Pfizer has advised investors that the Food and Drug Administration DA is expected to authorize its vaccine for 12-15 year olds in the coming days.  The company also said it expects to have enough information from clinical trials by September to request adding children aged 2 to 11, and that they expect to apply for use in children as young as six months old by November.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Today’s In Crisis headlines

(NEW YORK) -- Here are today's In Crisis headlines:

COVID-19 numbers
Here's the latest data on COVID-19 coronavirus infections, deaths and vaccinations.

Latest reported COVID-19 numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 153,605,244
Global deaths: 3,215,156.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 577,565.
Number of countries/regions: at least 192
Total patients recovered globally: 90,345,779

Latest reported COVID-19 numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 32,472,178 reported cases in 50 states + the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 577,565.  California has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 61,967.
U.S. total people tested: 437,469,331

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in California, with 3,747,337 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 39.51 million.  This ranks third in the world after England, which has 3,863,354 cases, and Maharashtra, India, which leads the world with 4,771,022 reported cases.  Texas is second in the U.S., with 2,901,598 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 29 million.

Latest reported COVID-19 vaccination numbers in the United States
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a total of 312,509,575 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been distributed in the U.S.  Of those, 246,780,203 doses have been administered, with 147,517,734 people receiving at least one dose and 105,523,520 people fully vaccinated, representing 44.4% and 31.8% of the total U.S. population, respectively. The Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines each require two doses to be effective.  The Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires a single dose to be effective.

US COVID-19 cases lowest since October; more states lifting restrictions
The U.S. marked a significant milestone over the weekend, with the seven-day COVID-19 case average falling to below 50,000 for the first time since October, 10, according to figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Health and Human Services.  The news comes as more states are moving to lift pandemic restrictions that in some cases have been in place for more than a year.  New York, New Jersey and Connecticut are easing most capacity limits on retail shops, restaurants, gyms, museums and offices, but there must be enough room for six feet of social distancing.  In New York City, 24-hour subway service will resume May 17 for the first time in over a year.  Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has signed what he said was an executive order invalidating all remaining local emergency COVID orders, and Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt is withdrawing his state’s state of emergency, effective today.

States offering COVID-19 vaccine incentives to overcome hesitancy
The latest CDC numbers show that close to one-third of the total U.S. population, 31.8%, has been completely vaccinated against COVID-19.  Yet with millions of Americans skipping their second vaccine dose, or electing to skip vaccination altogether, officials are finding ways to incentivize the push to immunize.  Maryland Governor Larry Hogan has announced a $100 financial incentive to state employees who elect to receive the vaccine.  Last week, West Virginia Governor Jim Justice announced that younger residents will receive a $100 state bond if they get immunized.  And in New Jersey, Governor Phil Murphy announced a ‘Shot and a Beer’ program Monday that provides a free glass of beer at participating locations to anyone over 21 who gets their first vaccination dose this month and shows their vaccination card.  Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont, who announced a similar program in his state last week, said Monday that Connecticut has become the first in the nation to achieve full COVID-19 vaccination for 50% of all adults aged 18+.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


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