On Air Now

Impact
10:00am - 12:00pm
Middays With Impact
Impact

In Crisis News

Today’s In Crisis headlines

(NEW YORK) -- Here are today's In Crisis headlines:

COVID-19 numbers
Here's the latest data on COVID-19 coronavirus infections and deaths.


Latest reported numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 30,211,680
Global deaths: 946,710.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 197,655.
Number of countries/regions: at least 188
Total patients recovered globally: 20,551,632

Latest reported numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 6,676,410 reported cases in 50 states the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 197,655.  New York State has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 33,070.
U.S. total patients recovered: 2,540,334
U.S. total people tested: 91,546,598

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in California, with 775,679 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 39.51 million.  That ranks third in the world after Maharashtra, India, which has 1,145,840 reported cases, and Sao Paulo, Brazil, which has 916,821 reported cases.

US sees rise in both new cases and deaths over past week
Week-over-week comparisons show the number of new COVID-19 cases and the number of new deaths are both increasing in the United States, according to an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News on Thursday night. Eleven U.S. states and territories are in an upward trajectory of new cases, while 12 jurisdictions are at a plateau and 32 others are going down, the memo said. There were 269,769 new cases confirmed across the nation during the period of Sept 10-16, a 5.3% jump from the previous week. Meanwhile, 6,015 coronavirus-related deaths were recorded during that same period, a 16.3% increase compared with the seven days prior, according to the memo. FEMA maps and charts also show a number of emerging COVID-19 hotspots in Wisconsin, which reported a record-breaking 2,034 new cases on Thursday.


Fourth grade teacher builds her own outdoor classroom amid COVID-19
A fourth grade teacher has built an outdoor classroom as her students return to in-person learning during the pandemic, Good Morning America reports. With help from her family, Lindsey Earle of Prairie Hill Waldorf School in Pewaukee, Wisconsin, built a structure for the 13 students in her class. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says outdoor spaces are less risky when it comes to the spread of COVID-19. Earle's classroom sits on school property. It features a tented roof, a chalkboard and canvas chairs with desktops made from outdoor sign boards. Desks are socially distanced based on CDC guidelines, and children must wear their masks when engaging in one-on-one instruction, or leaving their seats.


Scientists may have figured out how COVID-19 spread from animals to humans

iStock/svetikd (WASHINGTON, D.C.) -- It is widely believed that COVID-19 was transmitted from an animal to a human being, which sparked the global pandemic.  Nine months later, scientists may have finally solved the mystery how that happened.

Researchers were able to compare the mutations of the novel coronavirus -- known as the SARS-CoV-2 virus -- to other known illnesses and created a map, eventually discovering a "single lineage responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic." 

That particular virus has been documented in bats for 40 to 70 years.

Dr. David Robertson, head of viral genomics and bioinformatics at the Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation at the University of Glasgow, said, "While the new virus looks like coronaviruses that circulate naturally, it's unique in ways we didn't know about before the pandemic."

As for how the virus jumped to humans, it's believed the illness mutated and infected another intermediary animal -- like a pangolin -- before evolving again.

Either way, Robertson says the research proves the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic now that a clear genetic code has been mapped out -- meaning the science debunks the conspiracy theory that the virus was man made.

He also believes this research will be critical in helping to better prepare for the next global pandemic.

COVID-19 isn't the first, nor will it be the last virus that originated in animals before passing onto humans.  West Nile virus and Ebola both originated in animals before spreading to mankind.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Andre Braugher hopes 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' will "commit" to telling honest stories about policing

Eddy Chen/NBC(LOS ANGELES) -- In the midst of the Black Lives Matter movement, Brooklyn Nine-Nine star Andre Braugher is seeing his portrayal of police officers in a new light. 

For the past seven years, Braugher is known to TV viewers as beloved Captain Holt on the critically acclaimed NBC comedyBefore that, he spent seven seasons as Detective Frank Pembleton on the '90s cop show, Homicide: Life on the Street. 

Speaking to Variety, Braugher says that cop shows hold a certain responsibility when it comes to accurately portraying the police system in America, and has noticed a specific trend in how police officers are portrayed on screen. 

“I look up after all these decades of playing these characters, and I say to myself, it’s been so pervasive that I’ve been inside this storytelling, and I, too, have fallen prey to the mythology that’s been built up. It’s almost like the air you breathe or the water that you swim in. It’s hard to see," he explains. 

"But because there are so many cop shows on television, that’s where the public gets its information about the state of policing. Cops breaking the law to quote, ‘defend the law,’ is a real terrible slippery slope," he continues.

"It has given license to the breaking of law everywhere, justified it and excused it. That’s something that we’re going to have to collectively address -- all cop shows. The myth that the outcomes of the criminal justice system are not dependent upon your race has to be confronted.” 

As Brooklyn approaches its eighth season, the actor hopes that the show will "commit itself" to telling the stories of the relationship between race and policing in an honest way.

The new season of Brooklyn Nine-Nine is expected to premiere in 2021.  

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Today’s In Crisis headlines

(NEW YORK) -- Here are today's In Crisis headlines:

860,000 Americans filed jobless claims last week
Some 860,000 Americans lost their jobs and filed for unemployment insurance last week, the Labor Department said Thursday. The latest tally shows that new jobless claims have dipped significantly since peaking at 6.9 million in the last week of March. Still, it shatters the pre-pandemic weekly record set in 1982 of 695,000. Meanwhile, more than 29.7 million people are still claiming unemployment benefits through all programs as of the week ending Aug. 29, the DOL said Thursday. In the same week last year, there were less than 1.5 million people claiming jobless benefits through all programs. For the week ending Aug. 29, the states with the highest insured unemployment rates were Hawaii (20.3%), California (17.3%) and Nevada (15.6%).


COVID-19 numbers

Here's the latest data on COVID-19 coronavirus infections and deaths.

Latest reported numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 29,902,196
Global deaths: 941,381. The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 196,831.
Number of countries/regions: at least 188
Total patients recovered globally: 20,339,873

Latest reported numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 6,631,751 reported cases in 50 states the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 196,831. New York State has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 33,042.
U.S. total patients recovered: 2,525,573
U.S. total people tested: 90,710,730

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in California, with 772,188 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 39.51 million. That ranks third in the world after Maharashtra, India, which has 1,121,221 reported cases, and Sao Paulo, Brazil, which has 909,428 reported cases.

Public health officials say they need more money for COVID-19 vaccine distribution
Public health officials working to make a potential COVID-19 vaccine available to all Americans said they need more than $25 billion to make it happen, but the continued impasse between the Trump administration and congressional Democrats on another coronavirus relief package has stalled that much-needed funding. During a briefing in front of a Senate Appropriations Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield said Wednesday that at this point the CDC does not have the resources to distribute a vaccine across the country, including infrastructure to accommodate transporting and storing doses at cold temperatures. He also testified that a vaccine will be "generally available to the American public" in the "late second quarter, third quarter 2021,” and said masks are more effective than a vaccine when it comes to COVID-19. At a White House news conference Wednesday evening, President Donald Trump disagreed with both assessments and said Redfield probably “made a mistake.”

2-month-old baby dies from COVID-19 in Michigan
A 2-month-old baby in Michigan has died from COVID-19. Michigan's chief medical executive, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, announced the infant's death during a press conference Wednesday, while discussing how children are not spared from the novel coronavirus. Nearly 800 children across the United States have been diagnosed with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), a new pediatric disease associated with COVID-19 that can cause multiple organs to fail, according to Khaldun. Twenty children under the age of 1 have died of COVID-19 nationwide as of Sept. 12, according to the latest data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


US reports highest daily death toll in weeks

iStock/IvelinRadkov (NEW YORK) -- After seeing a slow drop off of daily COVID-10-related deaths, the nation marked its highest in weeks on Wednesday.  1,422 Americans died within a 24 hour period on Tuesday, the highest number since August 12.

That number is still below the record high reported on April 17, with 2,666 fatalities.

Overall COVID-19 cases continue to remain at a worrying amount, with 52,081 new cases reported Tuesday.  That number is still better from the record high reported on July 16, with 77,255 new cases. 

That number could be on the rise again, according to an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, of which was obtained by ABC News, which hones in on several breakouts in the Northeastern region of the U.S. and has identified "emerging hotspots" in the region, including Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Conversely, New York -- which was once the epicenter of the nation -- has reported that its infection rate has dropped below a percentage point.  The new infection rate touted by the state stands at 0.87 percent.  However, Governor Andrew Cuomo says residents should not take this as a sign things are returning to normal, cautioning that "this thing is not over."

"Having our infection rate come back down to 0.87 is great news for us -- we don't want to see our infection rate go over one percent for any period of time," he added. "It's going to take all of us to keep wearing our masks, washing our hands and remaining socially distant."

As of late Wednesday, COVID-19 has infected over 6.6 million Americans and killed nearly 197,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. 

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

During the pandemic, people are getting tattoos of masks, toilet paper and symbols of strength

iStock/da-kuk(NEW YORK) -- In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, people around the world are getting tattoos to commemorate these unprecedented times. 

A recent article by Insider chronicles what tattoos people are getting during this time and why. 

A medical professional named Lynnette Carey traveled from her home state of Texas to New York City in March to help the overwhelmed Brooklyn VA Medical Center. To honor the experience, she got a tattoo of a mask-wearing nurse aiding a limping Statue of Liberty, which frames her efforts "in a positive way, where I can look back and be proud of what I did to help," Carey states. 

Meanwhile, Bubba Nicholson of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada got a tattoo of a 16th century plague mask and a set of praying hands holding a bottle of hand sanitizer and rosary beads, accompanied by the words "what doesn't kill us makes us stranger."

"I'm always gonna remember this period of time, where I've seen so much disintegrate around me, and from a personal, mental standpoint, found myself so much stronger," Nicholson shares of the inspiration behind the imagery.

Mask-covered faces, a dagger piercing through a cell infected with the virus, and even toilet paper, are some of the other images people have been getting inked with during the pandemic. 

According to Insider, Assistant Professor of Counseling, School Psychology and Special Education at Edinboro University Everett Painter, who's researched the connection between trauma and tattoos, states that the ink can often provide a sense of "comfort" in a traumatic situation. 

"It brings people some comfort in a way, just to be reminded 'I've dealt with this, I've overcome it, and it doesn't control me anymore.' It doesn't define who I am,'" he says.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


'South Park' to address COVID-19 in upcoming special

Comedy Central(LOS ANGELES) -- South Park, Comedy Centrals raunchy cartoon show will tackle the COVID-19 pandemic in an upcoming hour-long special, the cable channel announced on Tuesday.

The episode, titled "The Pandemic Special," finds Stan's father Randy "coming to terms with his role in the COVID-19 outbreak," as the citizens of the titular town deal with the continued challenges of the pandemic, according to Comedy Central.

Meanwhile, the kids return to school, only to find that nothing is the same -- not their teachers, not their homeroom, not even Cartman.

South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, seems to mock their own concept in a teaser trailer for the special, in which Randy's wife Sharon asks incredulously, "A pandemic special? Really?"

The upcoming special, the first new episode since South Park ended its last season back in December, also marks its first one-hour installment. The show typically runs a half-hour.

South Park "The Pandemic Special" airs September 30 at 8 p.m. ET on Comedy Central.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

James Corden hosts 'Late Late Show' from home after contact with someone testing positive for COVID-19

Terence Patrick/CBS ©2020 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved(LOS ANGELES) -- James Corden, host of CBS' The Late Late Show, led the program remotely from his home on Monday after learning he'd "come into contact with someone who recently tested positive for COVID-19."

Appearing via a TV set placed on top of his Late Late Show desk, Corden revealed that he had "taken the test," and that it had "come back negative."

"Out of abundance of caution for everyone who works on the show, I’m going to host the show over Zoom way more than six feet apart from anyone," he continued, "but my face will still be here, in the studio.”

The rest of The Late Late Show crew was on set as usual.

Sources tell Deadline, that the contact to which Corden referred happened outside of work, and no one else from the show was involved. His decision to self-quarantine was part of the standard COVID contact-tracing procedure.

The Late Late Show returned to the studio August 11, and production has been running smoothly, despite a handful of COVID-19 positive cases being reported last month at the Television City complex where it films.

“It’s a shame because I thought like we were really getting into a rhythm in the studio,” Corden mused during his opening monologue.

The Late Late Show with James Corden airs weeknights at 12:37 a.m. ET on CBS.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Neil Patrick Harris reveals he and his family contracted COVID-19

Tyler Essary/NBC(NEW YORK) -- Another celebrity has come forward with a COVID-19 horror story, only this time, their entire family suffered from the virus.  Neil Patrick Harris revealed on Tuesday that he, along with his husband David Burtka and their nine-year-old twins Gideon and Harper, contracted the novel coronavirus.

"It happened very early, like late March, early April," the How I Met Your Mother star disclosed to TODAY. "We were doing our best before, and I thought I had the flu, and I didn't want to be paranoid about it. And then I lost my sense of taste and smell, which was a big indicator, so we holed up."

Harris spoke more on how his family weathered the virus, describing that "it was not pleasant."

"We feel great [now,]" he added. "We got through it and have antibodies and are feeling good."

The 47-year-old actor said his brush with the pandemic opened his eyes as to how real and serious the virus is.  "We want to make sure everyone's doing their best to slow this down every way possible, for sure," he attested.

The interview then pivoted to a much lighter topic, the revival of his old show Doogie Howser, M.D., of which he is incredibly jazzed about even though he won't be involved in the reboot.

The series will instead focus on a female Howser named Lahela "Doogie" Kamealoha, a multiracial teenager. 

"I was excited to hear about [the news,]" the Emmy nominee gushed. "It's a great idea, so it has all the aspects of making it a success, and I wish them nothing but the best."

"I don't know other than what's been reported, but I do know that it's to be on Disney , which is a super great channel," plugged Harris. "I love that stuff."


Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Today’s In Crisis headlines

(NEW YORK) -- Here are today's In Crisis headlines:

$12 million settlement reached in fatal Kentucky police shooting of Breonna Taylor
The city of Louisville, Kentucky, has reached a record $12 million settlement with the family of Breonna Taylor, the emergency medical technician shot to death by police in her own home. The settlement was announced by city officials and Taylor's family on Tuesday afternoon and includes a major police reform package. Among the reforms will be efforts to build stronger connections between police and the communities they serve, a program to include social workers in the Louisville Metro Police Department and an increase in random drug testing of officers. Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, says justice for her daughter does not stop with the settlement. The three officers involved in the March 13 shooting have yet to be charged.

COVID-19 numbers
Here's the latest data on COVID-19 coronavirus infections and deaths.

Latest reported numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 29,611,845
Global deaths: 935,929.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 195,961.
Number of countries/regions: at least 188
Total patients recovered globally: 20,105,101

Latest reported numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 6,606,859 reported cases in 50 states the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 195,961.  New York State has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 33,038.
U.S. total patients recovered: 2,495,127
U.S. total people tested: 89,987,708

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in California, with 768,763 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 39.51 million.  That ranks third in the world after Maharashtra, India, which has 1,097,856 reported cases, and Sao Paulo, Brazil, which has 901,271 reported cases.

President Trump says COVID-19 is “going away” even without vaccine
During an ABC News town hall on Tuesday night at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, President Donald Trump said the COVID-19 pandemic "is going away," even "without the vaccine." Medical experts, meanwhile, say there is no evidence that the novel coronavirus will go away without a vaccine.

The president also disputed that he had downplayed the pandemic, insisting that he had actually "up-played it in terms of action."

"I think what I did by closing up the country, I think I saved two, maybe two and a half [million] -- maybe more than that -- lives," he said. "I think we did a very good job. I don't know if that's been recognized."


US records highest daily COVID-19 death toll in weeks
An additional 1,422 coronavirus-related deaths were recorded in the United States on Tuesday, a more than threefold increase from the previous day, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University. The country's latest daily death toll from COVID-19 -- the highest since Aug. 12 -- is still under its record set on April 17, when there were 2,666 new fatalities in a 24-hour reporting period.

Elsewhere in the world, COVID-19 cases in India topped five million, as the country confirmed 90,123 new cases in the past 24 hours. And Israel recorded its highest single-day increase in COVID-19 cases on Tuesday. It saw 5,523 new diagnoses, according to the country’s health ministry.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


WHO announces plan to distribute COVID-19 vaccine worldwide

iStock/simon2579 (WASHINGTON, D.C.) -- With multiple counties working on a COVID-19 vaccine, with several already entering phase 3 of testing, the World Health Organization on Tuesday unveiled its plans to distribute a future vaccine to assuage fears that doses will be evenly disbursed among countries.

WHO has enacted the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization, or SAGE, to ensure citizens are prioritized over countries, meaning that doses will be made available to the most affected nations.

WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in Geneva on Friday, "The first priority must be to vaccinate some people in all the countries, rather than all the people in some countries...Vaccine nationalism will prolong the pandemic, not shorten it."

Dr. Ruth Faden, Ph.D., M.P.H., founder of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, approved of the plan.  "The idea behind the COVAX facility is that the world community unite in an enlightened and self-interested way to both incentivize and then distribute the vaccine so that there's no country in the world where no vaccines are available right from the beginning," said Faden. "The countries that come in who are self-financing are essentially helping themselves by helping the world." 

COVID-19 has infected nearly 30 million people across the globe -- killing nearly a million -- according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The U.S., who opted out of the global vaccine alliance, remains the worst-affected nation with 6.6 million confirmed cases and more than 195,000 deaths.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Survey shows Americans previously took time with loved ones for granted before the COVID-19 pandemic

iStock/Manuel Tauber-Romieri(NEW YORK) -- A new survey shows that while Americans have been feeling isolated during the COVID-19 pandemic, they're doing their best to maintain a positive mindset. 

In an unscientific survey hosted by digital photo frame company Nixplay, 2,000 American adults were asked a series of questions relating to their COVID-19 habits and state of mental health.

Of this focus group, 61 percent revealed that they took the time spent with loved ones before the pandemic hit for granted, while 77 percent say they've missed a special event or milestone such as a birthday, wedding or graduation due to the pandemic.

Among the top emotions felt with having to miss these special events include disappoint, depression and anger, with 23 percent of respondents stating they actually felt relieved. 

Additionally, 59 percent say that they have broken social distancing rules in order to see a loved one in-person. 

"I have chosen to get together with loved ones because the risk to mine and my family's health from COVID-19 is quite low and I benefit emotionally from interacting with my loved ones" and "I distanced for many months, until I felt that it was impeding severely on some of my family members mental health" were among the reasons why respondents chose to break quarantine guidelines for in-person contact. 

In spite of the difficult circumstances, a high level of the respondents say that they are trying to keep a positive outlook, with 62 percent stating that they're trying to make the best of the situation and not allow themselves to be overcome by factors they can't control.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


"Certified Young Person" Paul Rudd films PSA urging millennials to wear masks

Christopher Polk/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Paul Rudd is teaming up with the State of New York for a PSA encouraging young people to wear masks. 

In a video titled "Certified Young Person Paul Rudd Wants You to Wear a Mask," the actor appears in a yellow sweatshirt and sweatpants with a matching skateboard in hand, standing in front of a green screen of the New York City skyline and speaking all sorts of cool lingo to entice millennials to wear masks to stop the spread of COVID-19.

"I was talking on the iPhone with my homie, Governor Cuomo, and he's just going off about how us millennials need to wear masks because, get this, apparently a lot of COVID is transmitted by us millennials," Rudd begins, calling masks "totally beast." 

The 51-year-old later stages a fake phone call with a mask-wearing Billie Eilish and jokingly tells viewers that "caring about other people is the new not caring about other people."

He then takes to a makeshift Tik Tok video where, in between some sick dance moves, he poses a "stop the pandemic challenge" and a "save grandma challenge."

But the Ant-Man star takes a serious tone at the PSA's end, pleading with viewers to wear a mask, framing it as a simple step to helping to halt the spread of the virus.  

"It's easy, it's simple. Please, it's not hard. People are dying, hundreds of thousands of people are dying and it's preventable," he exclaims. "Just wear a mask, I shouldn't have to make it fun. It's science." 

Morgan Freeman, Robert DeNiro, Billy Crystal and Ellen Pompeo are some of the other actors who have participated in Cuomo's Mask Up America PSA campaign. 

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


'Law & Order: SUV' resumes filming in NYC

Virginia Sherwood/NBC(NEW YORK) -- Law & Order: SUV began production on its 22nd season in New York City on Monday, and the show's star, Mariska Hargitay celebrated the event by posting a couple of behind-the-scenes photos on her official Instagram page.

"It’s all happening...First day of shooting season 22!! Making history. So grateful to be back at work," wrote Hargitay, alongside a picture of the actress having her har styled and another of a group of crew members wearing masks.

Two days earlier, the 56-year-old actress, who has starred in the show since 1999, and is the longest running cast member, shared pictures from the cast's virtual table read for the COVID-19-themed season premiere, titled, "Remember Me in Quarantine."

Law & Order: SVU, TV’s longest-running primetime live-action series, is scheduled to return Thursday, November 12 at 9 p.m. ET on NBC.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Today’s In Crisis headlines

(NEW YORK) -- Here are today's In Crisis headlines:

Rochester mayor fires police chief over Daniel Prude's death
Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren fired Police Chief La'Ron Singletary Monday, two weeks before he was set to retire, as part of leadership changes following a review of Daniel Prude's death. Warren told reporters that the cursory management review of the city's handling of the March 23 incident showed that the city did not take Prude's death as seriously as it should have. She also suspended Rochester Corporation Counsel Tim Curtin and Communications Director Justin Roj for 30 days without pay for "failure to act, inform and follow policy and procedures.” The shakeup came a week after police body camera footage was released showing the incident between the officers and Prude, who was reportedly having a mental health emergency. Police put a spit bag over his head and pinned him down until he went unconscious. He died a week later.

COVID-19 numbers
Here's the latest data on COVID-19 coronavirus infections and deaths.


Latest reported numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 29,306,931
Global deaths: 929,026.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 194,545.
Number of countries/regions: at least 188
Total patients recovered globally: 19,881,668

Latest reported numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 6,555,247 reported cases in 50 states the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 194,084.  New York State has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 33,030.
U.S. total patients recovered: 2,474,570
U.S. total people tested: 89,603,688

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in California, with 765,918 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 39.51 million.  That ranks third in the world after Maharashtra, India, which has 1,077,374 reported cases, and Sao Paulo, Brazil, which has 893,349 reported cases.

University of Wisconsin-Madison votes to cancel spring break

Spring break is cancelled next year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The public research university’s faculty senate voted Monday to scrap the nine-day vacation from the school’s 2021 spring calendar as part of efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19, according to Madison ABC affiliate WKOW. Under the new schedule, spring classes would start a week later than usual, on January 25. And although spring break is cancelled, students would still have the following days off: March 27; the beginning of Passover, on April 2; Good Friday and April 3, the day before Easter.

Holiday Peeps on hold due to COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic is even affecting production of some of our favorite seasonal snacks. Peeps holiday marshmallows won’t be on store shelves this season, Just Born Quality Confections confirmed to ABC's Good Morning America. The marshmallow treats in the shapes of pumpkins, ghosts, Christmas trees and more “will not be in stores again until 2021.”

"Due to the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic, we temporarily suspended production of our candy brands to ensure the health and safety of our associates," a company spokesperson said.

While the Halloween, Christmas and Valentine's Day Peeps won’t be available, the company is making sure it can focus on “meeting the expected overwhelming demand for Peeps for next Easter season."

The halt in production will also impact seasonal varieties of the candies Mike and Ike and Hot Tamales.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Party 105.3 Videos

On Air Now

Impact
10:00am - 12:00pm
Middays With Impact
Impact

Breaking HIts

Recently Played

RITMO

By THE BLACK EYED PEAS & J BALVIN

12:27pm

Upcoming Events

    Currently being updated.